“Kiss me quick”

 

ileostylus-micranthus

Ileostylus Micranthus

 

“Kiss me quick”

In my work over the last 5 years I have been using plant forms as metaphors for human experience and interaction.

“Kiss me quick”, uses the New Zealand mistletoe to put forward a plea to think about the consequences of clearing land for farming and harvestable forest. Loss of biodiversity makes the remaining plants and animals vulnerable to disease and climatic change. While we need food as native animals do, we have not borne their needs in mind while fulfilling ours.

Mistletoes are hemi-parasites, making food from the air and sun like other plants, but getting all their water from their host tree. Birds flourish where mistletoes grow, eating their nectar and tasty berries and acting as propagators by depositing the seeds on another branch where a new plant can grow. In this way mistletoes “knit together ecosystems”*. However, deforestation, reducing numbers and density of native trees, has had a huge impact on mistletoe numbers and bird populations. Now only green mistletoe is still relatively widespread because it can live on a variety of indigenous and exotic trees whereas the other, single host varieties, are endangered.

To kiss is to touch and merge our life-breath, and in fairy tales, to bring back to life, or to “quicken”. In many cultures the mistletoe is linked with fertility, which led to the modern tradition of kissing under the mistletoe at Christmas. We must have a deep need for these symbolic acts if they have lasted so long. These knitted mistletoes, imitating plants which must use tricks to attract important pollinators and propagators, are using bright colours and their warm tactility to draw you in to sit awhile. And maybe, while you rest and enjoy this place, you will reflect on the many values of diversity.

*  Bec Stanley (Curator, Auckland Botanic Gardens) on RNZ Nights, 13 July 2015p1050316 p1050317

 

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A shady place to sit and contemplate….

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p1050404crop Juliette and Elisabeth Laird

Thank you to David and Geraldine Bayley of Kaipara Coast Sculpture Gardens who generously allow artists to alter these shelter huts as suits the artwork.

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