Update November 2018

Looking back, 2018 has been a full year – starting with the Whau Festival Clay workshop in May and culminating (so far) with installing work at NZ Sculpture OnShore which opened last night – November 2nd. So full that I have not been posting except a bit on facebook!

It has been a year of trying out the new and going further with the old – both techniques and materials, so in a way I feel pleased that I’ve so involved in making and thinking about making I have given little thought to putting up any information about what I am doing.

Working in the studio, playing with collage, stitch and found images has been interspersed with great opportunities:

 

  • at Tacit gallery in Hamilton, my first time sending work to an unknown space
  • at Whau Festival, bringing together my teaching experience with my enjoyment of participatory art-making in a drop-in clay workshop;
  • at Grey Gallery,  with Lyn Dallison and Carol Honson, showing the fruits of delving deep into themes and elements which seem part of my DNA;
  • at NZSoS, focusing on the audience, both in my own work and when guiding my Year 8 students to their first experience of exhibiting;
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The giant mangroves are coming

The mangroves which I first made a year ago were the seed from which have grown a pair of giant mangroves, two metres high on their arching legs, for the Harbourview Sculpture Trail which will open on March 5th.
This project has been an adventure in new material and skills. Many thanks to Jeff Thomson, sculptor extraordinaire in metal, for his help in assembling the steel frames of these creatures.

 


At home I built up a layered surface – first wire netting, to give the skeleton some “body”, and then a skin of plastics melted together. Stitching, ironing and the hot air gun were all applied to a range of plastics. Some melted almost way, shrinking in the heat, and others intensified in colour and stayed bright and whole.
Plastics fill our landfills and drift along the shoreline catching in mangroves and other intertidal plants. We need to address the issue of plastic waste – recycle what can be recycled (and there is a lot more that can be recycled now including soft plastics) and use other plastics sensibly! I am grateful to Vaughan at Polyprint Packaging who took the time to show me the process of making polythene bags, and told me about some of the recycling alternatives, as well as giving me a range of colourful off-cuts and samples which were most useful.